Today, using referrals in recruitment is more common than ever. In order to save time and money, companies are relying increasingly on their own employees to help them find new ones, according to this article published in the New York Times.

Nontheless making common networking mistakes can prevent any job seeker from getting hired. When it comes to looking for new employment opportunities, there’s no room for error, particularly when competition is fierce. Here are some common networking mistakes to avoid in your job search:

Handsome young business man shaking hand with colleague in office1. Forgetting About the Power of Face-To-Face Contact

Job seekers today “want to do everything online without actually pressing the flesh and meeting people in person,” said networking and communications technology expert, David Strom. “There’s no substitute for getting out there and introducing yourself to people who might know someone who is hiring.”

An article written by Ruth Mantell on the Wall Street Journal website titled “Networking Mistakes We Often Make” agrees with Strom’s deduction. Job seekers are misusing the Internet by relying on it too much and ignoring that there is less room for rejection when meeting with someone in person (e.g. not answering e-mails).

Arranging face-to-face meetings is easy with CityHour app. It searches for other professionals based on commonalities and shared objectives, as well as location and calendar availability. It can even tell you which professionals are nearby and available for a meeting in the next 2 hours, which take recruitment to a new speed.

“Go to at least two or three meetings a month, bring business cards and introduce yourself to people,” suggests Strom. “Don’t be shy. Even if you aren’t the most outgoing person, talk to one or two strangers and see if you can find common ground.” If you don’t have any events or meeetings planned, CityHour can solve that problem in seconds, presenting you with precisely the right people to connect with.

no-patience2. Expecting Too Much, Too Fast

In his article on Inc.com, “Top 5 Most Common Networking Mistakes,” author Jeff Haden writes that it is important to not ask for what upfront. We’ve got to give before we get.

Take some time to get to know your contact, and see how your skills or services could help them. Don’t focus on what they can do for you just yet. The goal is to broaden your network and develop long-term quality connections. Being selfish will get you nowhere.  

3. Not Having Enough Patience

Building a professional relationship is a lot like a romantic one – fragile – and it definitely requires hard work. According to career coaching website, Success Coaching, one of the top networking mistakes is a lack of patience in conversations and wanting to pitch them from the get-go.

It’s imperative to build up to your pitch. Focus on giving something to the other person first and figure out reasons to follow up with them.

thank you4. Not Saying Thank You

In an article on Forbes.com titled “4 Networking Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making,” the author highlights that not showing gratitude to your networking contacts makes a negative impression. Good manners will always win people over.

Life can get busy and it is easy to forget to send out a thank you card, so setting a reminder on Gmail to say thank you can help you remember. If you use CityHour app to set a meeting up, at the end of the meeting it’ll ask you how it went, which is also a good reminder to follow-up with a gracious thank you.

5. Not Dressing Appropriately

Whether it’s a networking event or simply meeting a new contact for lunch, dressing professionally can make a difference. You’re trying to get a job, not go out for beers with friends.

Dan Woog, wrote on Monster.com that “A networking meeting can be a rehearsal for a job interview, but no one will help you get your foot in the door if you give the impression that you’ll slouch through it once it’s open.”

Remember, you have to look and act the part so you can convince others that you’re dedicated to being the ultimate professional.